As promised, I’m following up on my earlier “Are You Certified?” post on the Microsoft Certified Solutions Associate track.

As a refresher, the MCSA track contains three components:

  • Exam 70-410, Installing and configuring WS 2012
  • Exam 70-411, Administering WS 2012
  • Exam 70-412, Configuring advanced WS 2012 services

I covered exam 410 in my first post, so today I’m providing a summary of exam 411, Administering WS 2012. I’ll cover the last exam in my next blog posts. Exam 411 is targeted for IT administrators who are managing WS 2012 in their IT environment. Topics covered include:

  • Implementing a Group Policy Infrastructure
  • Managing User and Service Accounts
  • Maintaining Active Directory Domain Services
  • Configure and Troubleshoot DNS
  • Configure and Troubleshoot Remote Access
  • Installing, Configuring, and Troubleshooting the Network Policy Server role
  • Optimizing File Services
  • Increasing File System Security
  • Implementing Update Management

The question distribution on this exam is weighted as follows:

Focus area Weight
Deploy, manage and maintain servers 17%
Configure file and print services 15%
Configure network services and access 17%
Configure a network policy server infrastructure 14%
Configure and manage active directory 19%
Configure and manage group policy 18%

Microsoft is offering a 5-day training class for MCSA, and I found a few other resources available here:

I recommend using the practice test questions and resources. We’ve had much success with certifications and these resources with our engineers here at Unitrends.

 

Good luck with your studies!

 

 

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